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The link between parasite-stress and complex psychological dispositions implies that the social, political, and economic benefits likely to flow from public health interventions that reduce rates of non-zoonotic infectious disease are far greater than have traditionally been thought. We sketch a prudential and ethical argument for increasing public health resources globally and redistributing these to focus on the alleviation of parasite-stress in human populations.

Original publication

DOI

10.1017/S0140525X11001026

Type

Journal article

Journal

Behav Brain Sci

Publication Date

04/2012

Volume

35

Pages

90 - 91

Keywords

Communicable Diseases, Family Relations, Humans, Parasitic Diseases, Religion and Psychology, Social Behavior, Stress, Psychological