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In 2008 the Australian Government introduced a national reform agenda to increase organ and tissue donation. Australia continues to perform poorly by international standards on measures of organ procurement, however. This paper outlines three proposals to improve donation rates and considers the empirical evidence available for each. A number of ethical objections frequently given to resist such proposals are also addressed. Firstly, it is recommended that Australia implement an 'opt-out' system of organ donation. Secondly, the existing veto rules should be changed to better protect the wishes of those who wish to donate. Finally, a numer of incentives should be offered to increase donation rates; these could include incentives of financial value, but also non-financial incentives such as prioritisation for the receipt of organs for previous donors.

Original publication

DOI

10.1007/s40592-015-0030-2

Type

Journal article

Journal

Monash Bioeth Rev

Publication Date

06/2015

Volume

33

Pages

91 - 101

Keywords

Ethics of organ procurement, Family-veto for organ donation, Incentives for organ donation, Opt-out organ donation, Australia, Caregivers, Ethics, Medical, Humans, Informed Consent, Moral Obligations, Motivation, Tissue Donors, Tissue and Organ Procurement