Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Genomics is increasingly becoming an integral component of health research and clinical care. The perceived difficulties associated with genetic research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people mean that they have largely been excluded as research participants. This limits the applicability of research findings for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. Emergent use of genomic technologies and personalised medicine therefore risk contributing to an increase in existing health disparities unless urgent action is taken. To allow the potential benefits of genomics to be more equitably distributed, and minimise potential harms, we recommend five actions: (1) ensure diversity of participants by implementing appropriate protocols at the study design stage; (2) target diseases that disproportionately affect disadvantaged groups; (3) prioritise capacity building to promote Indigenous leadership across research professions; (4) develop resources for consenting patients or participants from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds; and (5) integrate awareness of issues relating to Indigenous people into the governance structures, formal reviews, data collection protocols and analytical pipelines of health services and research projects.

Original publication

DOI

10.1007/s40592-015-0037-8

Type

Journal article

Journal

Monash Bioeth Rev

Publication Date

06/2015

Volume

33

Pages

203 - 209

Keywords

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, Genetic research, Genomics, Indigenous health, Personalised medicine, African Continental Ancestry Group, Australia, Ethics, Medical, Ethics, Research, Genetic Research, Humans, Melanesia, Metagenomics, Oceanic Ancestry Group, Population Groups, Precision Medicine