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Science is giving us more and better ways to manipulate and even to create living organisms. As this century proceeds we will be able to do with living things what our ancestors did with concrete, steel, glass, and electricity - rebuild the world. This talk will point out how hybrids, chimeras, genome edited organisms, cyborgs, and even odd "things" are becoming possible. Ultimately, it will ask how should we think of this and what should we do about it.

Henry T. Greely (BA ’74) specializes in the ethical, legal, and social implications of new biomedical technologies, particularly those related to neuroscience, genetics, or stem cell research. He frequently serves as an advisor on California, national, and international policy issues. He is chair of California’s Human Stem Cell Research Advisory Committee, a member of the Advisory Council of the NIH’s National Institute for General Medical Sciences, a member of the Committee on Science, Technology, and Law of the National Academies, a member of the Neuroscience Forum of the Institute of Medicine, and served from 2007-2010 as co-director of the Law and Neuroscience Project, funded by the MacArthur Foundation. Professor Greely chairs the steering committee for the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and directs both the law school’s Center for Law and the Biosciences and the Stanford Program in Neuroscience and Society. In 2007 Professor Greely was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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